Articles

Archangel Michael a/k/a Saint Michael a/k/a Sf. Mihai

archangel michael a/k/a sf. mihai gif art by amy adams

Sf. Mihai or Archangel Michael was mentioned to me in particular by an ex-cop turned Santeria Priest named Rob at a Botanica about 20 years ago. Since then I’ve had a keen interest in this leader of the other archangels. I have often identified with the warrior archetype and he is a warrior. In the past I’ve made some sketches of him, this is the first mixed media work, paint […]

Click here for art

The Conversation - Click here for art

Editor’s Note: The author of the following article closes it with the quote shown to the left. This is exactly where we have been headed for so long. People talk about rapid change but we have been seeing this change for many years now – artists have been creating and experimenting with technologies for a very long time only now we are becoming more and more aware through the internet. […]

Do you believe you’re good enough?

If you think you can, you can. And if you think you can't you're right - Henry Ford"

Since self-belief was a topic mentioned in the editor notes of a recent post, today I wanted to share this timely article entitled, Always Believe You’re Good Enough authored by John Westenberg. Just click on the link below on the left to read. The editor’s notes I am referring to are from the article posted recently about how creative people ‘really succeed’ by Jeff Goins. The idea about self belief […]

The Unfair Truth About How Creative People Really Succeed: On Networks, Connections, and Relationships

amy marie adams art blog : articles on art & artists

The Adams Art Blog Editor’s Note: A lot of great advice in this article by Jeff Goins and important for any artist or anyone in general who wants to breakthrough in their industry. In the article Jeff Goins speaks about a lot more than luck, yet the word luck stirred up some real emotions for me – for me I think there is really no such thing as luck (yet […]

The artist’s dilemma: what constitutes selling out?

street art

Editor’s note: Today I am sharing an article written by Yoav Litvin a Postdoctoral Research Associate at The Rockefeller University. He presents to us the “artist’s dilemma” and gives us a topic that ought to be discussed. Whilst he is addressing the dilemma artists face when they fail to act from integrity, it is important to note that selling out might mean different things to different people. Apparently Shepard Fairey […]

From dissident to decorative: why street art sold out and gentrified our cities

From dissident to decorative street art Brick Lane

Editor’s Notes: This topic discussed in the article that is being shared today – Rafael Schacter’s thoughts on Street Art as selling out – comes up a lot and not just with street art. Being called a sell out is a derogatory statement but it doesn’t mean it’s true. One of the most important ways artists can do their jobs properly is to receive appropriate compensation to live – the […]

Here’s looking at: Blue poles by Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock's Blue Poles or No. 11

Editor’s Note: Today I am sharing an article written by Kit Messham Muir of the Unversity of Newcastle that asks people to look at Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles painting. A lot of people seem to either love or hate him based on what he is most known for splatter paintings. However before you delve into the article which asks you to Look, See & Think – a great process for […]

Portraits are a fine art, so let’s embrace the selfie

BP Portrait Competition Finalists from 2014

Hannah Williams, University of Oxford Portraits are a fine art, so let’s embrace the selfie The BP Portrait Award 2014, which opens at the National Portrait Gallery this week, might seem to some like the celebration of a dying art. In our digital age, portraiture might seem to be less and less relevant when you can just snap a picture of someone with a camera. Or, of yourself. The selfie […]

Why artists installed 600 fake adverts at COP21

COP21Fake Advert VW photo by Thomas Dekeyser

Author: Thomas Dekeyser, University of SouthamptonWhy artists installed 600 fake adverts at COP21 It’s 72 hours before the official launch of COP21 and 60 volunteers – armed with four-way utility keys and 600 six-sheet posters – drift across the streets of Paris in screen-printed JC Decaux vests. Their mission: to illegally replace existing advertisements with artworks that raise concerns around the sponsorship of COP21 by large corporations such as Engie […]

Photography’s default history is told as art – it shouldn’t be

David Hill & Robert Adamson, Five Newhaven Fisherwomen, c. 1844. © Wilson Centre for Photography

Author: Elizabeth Edwards, De Montfort University We all think we know what photographs are, and why we have them. Photographs are everywhere. For the past 150 years they have penetrated, entangled and perhaps defined almost every area of human endeavour that we care to name – medicine, industry, tourism, relationships, archaeology, social policy – and that’s just for starters. They have rendered both the visible and invisible in certain ways […]

How photography evolved from science to art

English: Edward Steichen: Flatiron Building (1904)

Nancy Locke, Pennsylvania State University Much like a painting, a photograph has the ability to move, engage and inspire viewers. It could be a black-and-white Ansel Adams landscape of a snow-capped mountain reflected in a lake, with a sharpness and tonal range that bring out the natural beauty of its subject. Or it could Edward Weston’s close-up photograph of a bell pepper, an image possessing a sensuous abstraction that both […]

Major Ai Weiwei exhibition champions the visual power of dissent

Ai Weiwei "Spy Camera Lanterns

Maurizio Marinelli, University of Sussex In Chinese, the term “dissident” is translated in two different ways. The first (持不同政见者) has a very clear political connotation and literally refers to a person who supports a heterodox political opinion. The second (异己) indicates a more general alterity and non-conformism, the first character (异) alluding to something that is uncanny, out of the ordinary. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, whose latest exhibition opens at […]

The building blocks of dissidence: Chinese artist Ai Weiwei and #Legogate

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s installation titled Sacred at London’s Royal Academy of Arts in London, September 2015. AAP One

Ai Weiwei has been in the news quite a lot lately so today we are sharing this article written by Anne Harris from Monash University. Later this week there will be more shared here as well. Thanks for visiting the blog and feel free to share your thoughts and opinions in the comment section. Below this article are a series of links to ‘#legogate‘ articles. Author: Anne Harris, Monash UniversityThe […]

How an art history class became more engaging with Twitter

Author: Lauren Jimerson, Rutgers University When I was a college student, #art history courses revolved around a 1960s-era carousel slide projector. Its monotonous humming and clicking in the darkened lecture hall often put my classmates to sleep. For years, technology used in college art history classrooms was limited. Only in the past decade have departments transitioned from using the Kodak 35mm slide projector to computers with PowerPoint presentations. As I […]

Creativity might be playful – but it’s also work

disc color experiments no 2 by artist Amy Marie Adams

Author: David Court, Australian Film, Television and Radio School The view that art is essentially unworldly and #creativity is play has a long history, dating back to the Romantics in the 18th century. According to this view, art must be kept separate from money, lest it be corrupted, and creativity must be unshackled from the machinery of work. The economist John Maynard Keynes perhaps expressed it best when he said: […]

Which paintings were the most creative of their time? An algorithm may hold the answers

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, oil on canvas, 244 x 234 cm

Ahmed Elgammal, Rutgers University From Picasso’s The Young Ladies of Avignon to Munch’s The Scream, what was it about these paintings that arrested people’s attention upon viewing them, that cemented them in the canon of #art history as iconic works? In many cases, it’s because the artist incorporated a technique, form or style that had never been used before. They exhibited a creative and innovative flair that would go on […]

ARTICLE: my greatest failure and what I learned from it

Red Dog painting by Amy Marie Adams

Lesson 1. I DID NOT IMPLICITLY TRUST MYSELF = TRUST YOURSELF I fell into a trap of my own making by asking some friends which work they would like to see as a mural. That is not the wrong part. The wrong part was that even though I did not agree with them, I painted the mural that they preferred. Thereby going against my own gut instinct, because I did […]

ARTICLE: The Liberty Project: What’s behind it? and a few pix

the liberty project study 2 - artist amy marie adams

Studies for the Liberty Project: Two Paintings Acrylic on stretched canvas 30x40cm Oil on canvas mounted on board 40x40cm Here are 2 recent paintings for a project that I am working on, for now I will call it ‘The Liberty Project.’ Over the last years it seems that there is a lot of hate towards immigrants in the US and in addition since the whole 9/11 incident the US government […]

ARTICLE: Assigning titles to artworks: Untitled drawing and my thoughts about titles

Female Face Pastel Drawing | Artist Amy Marie Adams

Should an artist title their work or not? Recently an impassioned discussion occured just about that topic. Most of the participants thought titles were important for various reasons – the majority did. All of the people in the discussion have different reasons for making and presenting their art as well. Personally, I do title but more as a matter of tracking then anything else, it is more convenient for me. […]

Short Article: Icons on Glass | Icoane pe Sticla | artist: Klara Balazs

Glass icon by artist Klara Balazs from Tirgu Mures in Transylvania Romania

Icons are a vehicle for spiritual contemplation and there are so many beautiful ones out in the world. One particular type of icon is a glass icon. This tradition of painting icons on glass is predominantly Transylvanian. Here is an image from artist Klara Balazs who I found on sibiel.net. Check out the site as it is in several languages; English, Italian, French, Romanian. You can also visit this link […]