Art News Items

Here’s looking at: Blue poles by Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock's Blue Poles or No. 11

Editor’s Note: Today I am sharing an article written by Kit Messham Muir of the Unversity of Newcastle that asks people to look at Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles painting. A lot of people seem to either love or hate him based on what he is most known for splatter paintings. However before you delve into the article which asks you to Look, See & Think – a great process for […]

Why artists installed 600 fake adverts at COP21

COP21Fake Advert VW photo by Thomas Dekeyser

Author: Thomas Dekeyser, University of SouthamptonWhy artists installed 600 fake adverts at COP21 It’s 72 hours before the official launch of COP21 and 60 volunteers – armed with four-way utility keys and 600 six-sheet posters – drift across the streets of Paris in screen-printed JC Decaux vests. Their mission: to illegally replace existing advertisements with artworks that raise concerns around the sponsorship of COP21 by large corporations such as Engie […]

Photography’s default history is told as art – it shouldn’t be

David Hill & Robert Adamson, Five Newhaven Fisherwomen, c. 1844. © Wilson Centre for Photography

Author: Elizabeth Edwards, De Montfort University We all think we know what photographs are, and why we have them. Photographs are everywhere. For the past 150 years they have penetrated, entangled and perhaps defined almost every area of human endeavour that we care to name – medicine, industry, tourism, relationships, archaeology, social policy – and that’s just for starters. They have rendered both the visible and invisible in certain ways […]

How photography evolved from science to art

English: Edward Steichen: Flatiron Building (1904)

Nancy Locke, Pennsylvania State University Much like a painting, a photograph has the ability to move, engage and inspire viewers. It could be a black-and-white Ansel Adams landscape of a snow-capped mountain reflected in a lake, with a sharpness and tonal range that bring out the natural beauty of its subject. Or it could Edward Weston’s close-up photograph of a bell pepper, an image possessing a sensuous abstraction that both […]

Major Ai Weiwei exhibition champions the visual power of dissent

Ai Weiwei "Spy Camera Lanterns

Maurizio Marinelli, University of Sussex In Chinese, the term “dissident” is translated in two different ways. The first (持不同政见者) has a very clear political connotation and literally refers to a person who supports a heterodox political opinion. The second (异己) indicates a more general alterity and non-conformism, the first character (异) alluding to something that is uncanny, out of the ordinary. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, whose latest exhibition opens at […]

The building blocks of dissidence: Chinese artist Ai Weiwei and #Legogate

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s installation titled Sacred at London’s Royal Academy of Arts in London, September 2015. AAP One

Ai Weiwei has been in the news quite a lot lately so today we are sharing this article written by Anne Harris from Monash University. Later this week there will be more shared here as well. Thanks for visiting the blog and feel free to share your thoughts and opinions in the comment section. Below this article are a series of links to ‘#legogate‘ articles. Author: Anne Harris, Monash UniversityThe […]

How an art history class became more engaging with Twitter

Author: Lauren Jimerson, Rutgers University When I was a college student, #art history courses revolved around a 1960s-era carousel slide projector. Its monotonous humming and clicking in the darkened lecture hall often put my classmates to sleep. For years, technology used in college art history classrooms was limited. Only in the past decade have departments transitioned from using the Kodak 35mm slide projector to computers with PowerPoint presentations. As I […]

Which paintings were the most creative of their time? An algorithm may hold the answers

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, oil on canvas, 244 x 234 cm

Ahmed Elgammal, Rutgers University From Picasso’s The Young Ladies of Avignon to Munch’s The Scream, what was it about these paintings that arrested people’s attention upon viewing them, that cemented them in the canon of #art history as iconic works? In many cases, it’s because the artist incorporated a technique, form or style that had never been used before. They exhibited a creative and innovative flair that would go on […]

Art Mag Visual TV

Some items of interest for those of you who prefer to watch or listen to your ART news but I must warn you that this section is updated here and there with no regularity: Rare Van Gogh and Rockwell Paintings Uncovered Bonnard & Gauguin Paintings Worth 50M Appreciated Not Just for the Money